Astronomy Picture of the Day (Unofficial) apod@hub.polari.us

SPACE!

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-27 19:35:50.072262

    2019-01-28T01:35:51Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 27
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    From the Northern to the Southern Cross
    Image Credit & Copyright: Nicholas Buer

    Explanation: There is a road that connects the Northern to the Southern Cross but you have to be at the right place and time to see it. The road, as pictured here, is actually the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy; the right place, in this case, is dark Laguna Cejar in Salar de Atacama of Northern Chile; and the right time was in early October, just after sunset. Many sky wonders were captured then, including the bright Moon, inside the Milky Way arch; Venus, just above the Moon; Saturn and Mercury, just below the Moon; the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds satellite galaxies, on the far left; red airglow near the horizon on the image left; and the lights of small towns at several locations across the horizon. One might guess that composing this 30-image panorama would have been a serene experience, but for that one would have required earplugs to ignore the continued brays of wild donkeys.

    Tomorrow's picture: galaxy tail
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-27 12:30:02.100586

    2019-01-27T18:30:02Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 27
    See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download
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    From the Northern to the Southern Cross
    Image Credit & Copyright: Nicholas Buer

    Explanation: There is a road that connects the Northern to the Southern Cross but you have to be at the right place and time to see it. The road, as pictured here, is actually the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy; the right place, in this case, is dark Laguna Cejar in Salar de Atacama of Northern Chile; and the right time was in early October, just after sunset. Many sky wonders were captured then, including the bright Moon, inside the Milky Way arch; Venus, just above the Moon; Saturn and Mercury, just below the Moon; the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds satellite galaxies, on the far left; red airglow near the horizon on the image left; and the lights of small towns at several locations across the horizon. One might guess that composing this 30-image panorama would have been a serene experience, but for that one would have required earplugs to ignore the continued brays of wild donkeys.

    Tomorrow's picture: galaxy tail
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-26 12:30:01.764936

    2019-01-26T18:30:03Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 26
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    The Umbra of Earth
    Image Credit & Copyright: Antonio Finazzi

    Explanation: The dark, inner shadow of planet Earth is called the umbra. Shaped like a cone extending into space, it has a circular cross section most easily seen during a lunar eclipse. For example, on January 21 the Full Moon slid across the northern half of Earth's umbral shadow, entertaining moonwatchers around much of the planet. In the total phase of the eclipse, the Moon was completely within the umbra for 63 minutes. Recorded under clear, dark skies from the hills near Chiuduno, Italy this composite eclipse image uses successive pictures from totality (center) and partial phases to trace out a large part of the umbra's curved edge. Reflecting sunlight scattered by the atmosphere into Earth's shadow, the lunar surface appears reddened during totality. But close to the umbra's edge, the limb of the eclipsed Moon shows a distinct blue hue. The blue eclipsed moonlight originates as rays of sunlight pass through layers high in the upper stratosphere, colored by ozone that scatters red light and transmits blue.

    Tomorrow's picture: crossing the sky

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-25 12:30:01.461427

    2019-01-25T18:30:02Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 25
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    Moon Struck
    Image Credit & Copyright: Petr Horálek

    Explanation: Craters produced by ancient impacts on the airless Moon have long been a familiar sight. But only since the 1990s have observers began to regularly record and study optical flashes on the lunar surface, likely explosions resulting from impacting meteoroids. Of course, the flashes are difficult to see against a bright, sunlit lunar surface. But during the January 21 total eclipse many imagers serendipitously captured a meteoroid impact flash against the dim red Moon. Found while examining images taken shortly before the total eclipse phase began, the flash is indicated in the inset above, near the Moon's darkened western limb. Estimates based on the flash duration recorded by the Moon Impact Detection and Analysis System (MIDAS) telescopes in southern Spain indicate the impactor's mass was about 10 kilograms and created a crater between seven and ten meters in diameter.

    Tomorrow's picture: shadow-weekend
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-24 12:30:02.343968

    2019-01-24T18:30:04Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 24
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    Matterhorn, Moon, and Meteor
    Image Credit & Copyright: Stephane Vetter (Nuits sacrées), TWAN

    Explanation: Fans of planet Earth probably recognize the Matterhorn in the foreground of this night skyscape. Famed in mountaineering history, the 4,478 meter Alpine mountain stands next to the totally eclipsed Moon. In spite of -22 degree C temperatures, the inspired scene was captured on the morning of January 21 from the mountains near Zermatt, Switzerland. Different exposures record the dim red light reflected by the Moon fully immersed in Earth's shadow. Seen directly above the famous Alpine peak, but about 600 light-years away, are the stars of the Praesepe or Beehive star cluster also known as Messier 44. An added reward to the cold eclipse vigil, a bright and colorful meteor flashed below the temporarily dimmmed Moon, just tracing the Matterhorn's north-eastern climbing route along Hornli ridge.

    Tomorrow's picture: Moon Struck

    zykotick9, clacke@libranet.de ❌ likes this.

    clacke@libranet.de ❌ shared this.

    A spectacular sight, for several reasons 😲

    JanKusanagi at 2019-01-24T18:31:34Z

  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-23 12:30:02.300728

    2019-01-23T18:30:03Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 23
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    Orion over the Austrian Alps
    Image Credit & Copyright: Luk Vesel

    Explanation: Do you recognize this constellation? Through the icicles and past the mountains is Orion, one of the most identifiable star groupings on the sky and an icon familiar to humanity for over 30,000 years. Orion has looked pretty much the same during the past 50,000 years and should continue to look the same for many thousands of years into the future. Orion is quite prominent in the sky this time of year, a recurring sign of (modern) winter in Earth's northern hemisphere and summer in the south. Pictured, Orion was captured recently above the Austrian Alps in a composite of seven images taken by the same camera in the same location during the same night. Below and slightly to the right of Orion's three-star belt is the Orion Nebula, while the four bright stars surrounding the belt are, clockwise from the upper left, Betelgeuse, Bellatrix, Rigel, and Saiph.

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    Tomorrow's picture: the cold eclipse

    Stephen Sekula likes this.

  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-22 12:30:01.441169

    2019-01-22T18:30:02Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 22
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    Lunar Eclipse over Cologne Cathedral
    Image Credit & Copyright: Martin Junius

    Explanation: Why would a bright full Moon suddenly become dark? Because it entered the shadow of the Earth. That's what happened Sunday night as the Moon underwent a total lunar eclipse. Dubbed by some as a Super (because the Moon was angularly larger than usual, at least slightly) Blood (because the scattering of sunlight through the Earth's atmosphere makes an eclipsed Moon appeared unusually red) Wolf (because January full moons are sometimes called Wolf Moons from the legend that wolves like to howl at the moon) Moon Eclipse, the shadowy spectacle was visible from the half of the Earth then facing the Moon, and was captured in numerous spectacular photographs. Featured, a notable image sequence was captured over the Cologne Cathedral, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, in Cologne, Germany. The lunar eclipse sequence was composed from 68 different exposures captured over three hours during freezing temperatures -- and later digitally combined and edited to remove a cyclist and a pedestrian. The next total lunar eclipse will occur in 2021.

    Gallery: Sunday Night's Total Lunar Eclipse
    Tomorrow's picture: icy orion

    zykotick9, clacke@libranet.de ❌ likes this.

    clacke@libranet.de ❌ shared this.

    The streetlights are shooting at the moon!!


    Or worse, the moon is shooting at us! 😱

    JanKusanagi at 2019-01-23T17:45:08Z

  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-21 12:30:01.623287

    2019-01-21T18:30:02Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 21
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    InSight Lander Takes Selfie on Mars
    Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

    Explanation: This is what NASA's Insight lander looks like on Mars. With its solar panels, InSight is about the size of a small bus. Insight successfully landed on Mars in November with a main objective to detect seismic activity. The featured selfie is a compilation of several images taken of different parts of the InSight lander, by the lander's arm, at different times. SEIS, the orange-domed seismometer seen near the image center last month, has now been placed on the Martian surface. With this selfie, Mars InSight continues a long tradition of robotic spacecraft on Mars taking and returning images of themselves, including Viking, Sojourner, Pathfinder, Spirit, Opportunity, Phoenix, and Curiosity. Data taken by Mars Insight is expected to give humanity unprecedented data involving the interior of Mars, a region thought to harbor formation clues not only about Mars, but Earth.

    Growing Gallery: Last Night's Total Lunar Eclipse
    Tomorrow's picture: good lunar eclipse photo
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-19 12:30:01.830900

    2019-01-19T18:30:03Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 19
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    Total Lunar Eclipse at Moonset
    Image Credit & Copyright: Fred Espenak (MrEclipse.com, TWAN)

    Explanation: The Moon slid through Earth's shadow on January 31, 2018 in a total lunar eclipse. In this time-lapse sequence of that eclipse from Portal, Arizona, USA, the partial eclipse starts with the Moon high in the western sky. The eclipse total phase lasted about 76 minutes, but totality ended after the dark, reddened Moon set below the horizon. The upcoming total lunar eclipse, on the night of January 20/21, will be better placed for skygazers across the Americas, though. There, all 62 minutes of the total phase, when the Moon is completely immersed in Earth's dark umbral shadow, will take place with the Moon above the horizon. Watch it if you can. The next total lunar eclipse visible from anywhere on planet Earth won't take place until May 26, 2021, and then the total eclipse will last a mere 15 minutes.

    Tomorrow's picture: lunar eclipse video

    Ah, so that's what "moon rays" means... 😎

    JanKusanagi at 2019-01-20T21:55:47Z

  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-17 12:30:02.255728

    2019-01-17T18:30:03Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 17
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    Cabin under the Stars
    Image Credit & Copyright: P-M Hedén (Clear Skies, TWAN)

    Explanation: Gocka's, a family nickname for the mountain cabin, and a wooden sled from a generation past stand quietly under the stars. The single exposure image was taken on January 6 from Tanndalen Sweden to evoke a simple visual experience of the dark mountain skies. A pale band of starlight along the Milky Way sweeps through the scene. At the foot of Orion the Hunter, bright star Rigel shines just above the old kicksled's handrail. Capella, alpha star of Auriga the celestial charioteer, is the brightest star at the top of the frame. In fact, the familiar stars of the winter hexagon and the Pleiades star cluster can all be found in this beautiful skyscape from a northern winter night.

    Tomorrow's picture: night on a rotating planet

    I feel relaxed already! 😌

    JanKusanagi at 2019-01-17T19:03:10Z

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-15 12:30:01.452282

    2019-01-15T18:30:02Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 15
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    The Heart and Soul Nebulas
    Image Credit & Copyright: Mario Zauner

    Explanation: Is the heart and soul of our Galaxy located in Cassiopeia? Possibly not, but that is where two bright emission nebulas nicknamed Heart and Soul can be found. The Heart Nebula, officially dubbed IC 1805 and visible in the featured image on the bottom right, has a shape reminiscent of a classical heart symbol. The Soul Nebula is officially designated IC 1871 and is visible on the upper left. Both nebulas shine brightly in the red light of energized hydrogen. Also shown in this three-color montage is light emitted from sulfur, shown in yellow, and oxygen, shown in blue. Several young open clusters of stars are visible near the nebula centers. Light takes about 6,000 years to reach us from these nebulas, which together span roughly 300 light years. Studies of stars and clusters like those found in the Heart and Soul Nebulas have focused on how massive stars form and how they affect their environment.

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    Tomorrow's picture: open space
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-14 12:30:02.260530

    2019-01-14T18:30:03Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 14
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    Meteor and Milky Way over the Alps
    Image Credit & Copyright: Nicholas Roemmelt (Venture Photography)

    Explanation: Now this was a view with a thrill. From Mount Tschirgant in the Alps, you can see not only nearby towns and distant Tyrolean peaks, but also, weather permitting, stars, nebulas, and the band of the Milky Way Galaxy. What made the arduous climb worthwhile this night, though, was another peak -- the peak of the 2018 Perseids Meteor Shower. As hoped, dispersing clouds allowed a picturesque sky-gazing session that included many faint meteors, all while a carefully positioned camera took a series of exposures. Suddenly, a thrilling meteor -- bright and colorful -- slashed down right next the nearly vertical band of the Milky Way. As luck would have it, the camera caught it too. Therefore, a new image in the series was quickly taken with one of the sky-gazers posing on the nearby peak. Later, all of the images were digitally combined.

    Tomorrow's picture: heart & soul

    Stephen Sekula likes this.

  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-13 12:30:01.922288

    2019-01-13T18:30:02Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 13
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    Tycho's Supernova Remnant in X-ray
    Image Credit: NASA / CXC / F.J. Lu (Chinese Academy of Sciences) et al.

    Explanation: What star created this huge puffball? What's pictured is the hot expanding nebula of Tycho's supernova remnant, the result of a stellar explosion first recorded over 400 years ago by the famous astronomer Tycho Brahe. The featured image is a composite of three X-ray colors taken by the orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory. The expanding gas cloud is extremely hot, while slightly different expansion speeds have given the cloud a puffy appearance. Although the star that created SN 1572, is likely completely gone, a star dubbed Tycho G, too dim to be discerned here, is thought to be a companion. Finding progenitor remnants of Tycho's supernova is particularly important because the supernova is of Type Ia, an important rung in the distance ladder that calibrates the scale of the visible universe. The peak brightness of Type Ia supernovas is thought to be well understood, making them quite valuable in exploring the relationship between faintness and farness in the distant universe.

    Tomorrow's picture: meteor mountain
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-12 12:30:01.951584

    2019-01-12T18:30:02Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 12
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    Milky Way Falls
    Image Credit & Copyright: Yuri Beletsky (Carnegie Las Campanas Observatory, TWAN)

    Explanation: It can be the driest place on planet Earth, but water still flows in Chile's Atacama desert, high in the mountains. After discovering this small creek with running water, the photographer returned to the site to watch the Milky Way rise in the dark southern skies, calculating the moment when Milky Way and precious flowing water would meet. In the panoramic night skyscape, stars and nebulae immersed in the glow along the Milky Way itself also shared that moment with the Milky Way's satellite galaxies the Large and Small Magellanic clouds above the horizon at the right. Bright star Beta Centauri is poised at the very top of the waterfall. Above it lies the dark expanse of the Coalsack nebula and the stars of the Southern Cross.

    Tomorrow's picture: when stars explode
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-11 12:30:01.696327

    2019-01-11T18:30:02Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 11
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    Partial Eclipse over Beijing
    Image Credit & Copyright: Li Zhaoqi

    Explanation: On January 6 the New Moon rose in silhouette with the Sun seen from northeastern Asia. Near maximum, the dramatic partial solar eclipse is captured in this telephoto view through hazy skies. In the foreground, the hill top Wanchun pavilion overlooking central Beijing's popular Forbidden City hosts eclipse-watching early morning risers. This was the first of five, three solar and two lunar, eclipses for 2019. Next up is a total lunar eclipse during this month's Full Perigee Moon. At night on January 21, that celestial shadow play will be visible from the hemisphere of planet Earth that includes the Americas, Europe, and western Africa.

    APOD Lecture Tonight: Amateur Astronomers Association of New York at American Museum of Natural History, NYC
    Tomorrow's picture: Milky Way Falls

    clacke@libranet.de ❌ likes this.

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    Some giant took a bite out of the Sun!!!!! 😱

    JanKusanagi at 2019-01-11T19:18:58Z

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-10 12:30:02.378132

    2019-01-10T18:30:03Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 10
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    Vela Supernova Remnant Mosaic
    Image Credit & Copyright: Robert Gendler, Roberto Colombari, Digitized Sky Survey (POSS II)

    Explanation: The plane of our Milky Way Galaxy runs through this complex and beautiful skyscape. Seen toward colorful stars near the northwestern edge of the constellation Vela (the Sails), the 16 degree wide, 200 frame mosaic is centered on the glowing filaments of the Vela Supernova Remnant, the expanding debris cloud from the death explosion of a massive star. Light from the supernova explosion that created the Vela remnant reached Earth about 11,000 years ago. In addition to the shocked filaments of glowing gas, the cosmic catastrophe also left behind an incredibly dense, rotating stellar core, the Vela Pulsar. Some 800 light-years distant, the Vela remnant is likely embedded in a larger and older supernova remnant, the Gum Nebula. Objects identified in this broad mosaic include emission and reflection nebulae, star clusters, and the remarkable Pencil Nebula.

    Tomorrow's picture: New Moon rise
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-09 12:30:02.075441

    2019-01-09T18:30:02Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 9
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    Quadrantids
    Image Credit & Copyright: Daniel López (El Cielo de Canarias)

    Explanation: Named for a forgotten constellation, the Quadrantid Meteor Shower is an annual event for planet Earth's northern hemisphere skygazers It usually peaks briefly in the cold, early morning hours of January 4. The shower's radiant on the sky lies within the old, astronomically obsolete constellation Quadrans Muralis. That position is situated near the boundaries of the modern constellations Hercules, Bootes, and Draco. About 30 Quadrantid meteors can be counted in this skyscape composed of digital frames recorded in dark and moonless skies between 2:30am and local dawn. The shower's radiant is rising just to the right of the Canary Island of Tenerife's Teide volcano, and just below the familiar stars of the Big Dipper on the northern sky. A likely source of the dust stream that produces Quadrantid meteors was identified in 2003 as an asteroid. Look carefully and you can also spot a small, telltale greenish coma above the volcanic peak and near the top of the frame. That's the 2018 Christmas visitor to planet Earth's skies, Comet Wirtanen.

    Tomorrow's picture: southern sails
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-08 12:30:02.296497

    2019-01-08T18:31:06Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 8

    HESS Telescopes Explore the High-Energy Sky
    Video Credit & Copyright: Vikas Chander, H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Music: Emotive Piano by Immersive Music

    Explanation: They may look like modern mechanical dinosaurs but they are enormous swiveling eyes that watch the sky. The High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) Observatory is composed of four 12-meter reflecting-mirror telescopes surrounding a larger telescope housing a 28-meter mirror. They are designed to detect strange flickers of blue light -- Cherenkov radiation --emitted when charged particles move slightly faster than the speed of light in air. This light is emitted when a gamma ray from a distant source strikes a molecule in Earth's atmosphere and starts a charged-particle shower. H.E.S.S. is sensitive to some of the highest energy photons (TeV) crossing the universe. Operating since 2003 in Namibia, H.E.S.S. has searched for dark matter and has discovered over 50 sources emitting high energy radiation including supernova remnants and the centers of galaxies that contain supermassive black holes. Pictured last September, H.E.S.S. telescopes swivel and stare in time-lapse sequences shot in front of our Milky Way Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds -- as the occasional Earth-orbiting satellite zips by.

    Open Science: Browse 1,800+ codes in the Astrophysics Source Code Library
    Tomorrow's picture: forgotten stars
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-07 12:30:02.297540

    2019-01-07T18:30:03Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 7
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    Stars, Meteors, and a Comet in Taurus
    Image Credit & Copyright: Juan Carlos Casado (TWAN, Earth and Stars)

    Explanation: This was an unusual night to look in the direction of the Bull. The constellation Taurus is always well known for hosting two bright star clusters -- the Pleaides, visible on the right, and the comparatively diffuse Hyades, visible on the left. This night last month, however, was atypically the peak of the Geminid meteor shower, and so several meteors were caught shooting through the constellation with parallel trails. More unusually still, Comet Wirtanen was drifting through the constellation, here appearing near the image bottom surrounded by a greenish coma. The comet was near its brightest as it sped past the Earth. The orange star on the upper left is Aldebaran, considered to be the eye of the Bull. Aldebaran is the brightest star in Taurus and the 15th brightest star in the sky. The featured image is a combination of nearly 800 exposures taken from the Spanish village Albany.

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    Tomorrow's picture: high energy sky
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2019-01-06 12:30:02.239879

    2019-01-06T18:30:03Z via PyPump To: Public

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2019 January 6
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    A Laser Strike at the Galactic Center
    Image Credit: Yuri Beletsky (Carnegie Las Campanas Observatory, TWAN), ESO

    Explanation: Why are these people shooting a powerful laser into the center of our Galaxy? Fortunately, this is not meant to be the first step in a Galactic war. Rather, astronomers at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) site in Chile are trying to measure the distortions of Earth's ever changing atmosphere. Constant imaging of high-altitude atoms excited by the laser -- which appear like an artificial star -- allow astronomers to instantly measure atmospheric blurring. This information is fed back to a VLT telescope mirror which is then slightly deformed to minimize this blurring. In this case, a VLT was observing our Galaxy's center, and so Earth's atmospheric blurring in that direction was needed. As for inter-galaxy warfare, when viewed from our Galaxy's center, no casualties are expected. In fact, the light from this powerful laser would combine with light from our Sun to together appear only as bright as a faint and distant star.

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    Tomorrow's picture: busy bull